The Hillary Clinton email case may not have been put to rest just yet. Despite Democrats’ attempt to distract the pubic with accusations of Russian involvement in our presidential election, an investigation in Clinton’s emails carried on. The Hill just reported “thanks to the relentless investigative work of Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairman Ron Johnson (R-Wis.), we are learning that the Hillary Clinton email case may not really be settled.”

A memo updating Senators Grassley and Johnson on the investigation, disclosed that in 2016, the FBI investigation that included James Comey, Andrew McCabe and Peter Strzok “failed to pursue access to ‘highly classified’ evidence that could have resolved important questions” reported The Hill.

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Disturbing is that not only did the FBI decide not to look at critical evidence in 2016, but Senator Grassley wrote a classified letter to DOJ “on October 17, 2018, which remains unanswered. On January 15, 2019, at Mr. Barr’s nomination hearing, Senator Grassley asked Mr. Barr if he would answer the letter, of confirmed, to which he attested, ‘Yes, Senator.”

As of April 16, 2019 the Senators sent a letter to Attorney General Barr “reiterating the need for a written response to that letter.” The Hill reminds us that back when Comey was FBI Director, findings “in the Clinton case concluded her transmission of classified emails through an unsecure server was ‘grossly negligent.” And more importantly, it fit the legal standard “supporting a felony charge under the Espionage Act.”

Findings were changed to “extremely careless” instead of “grossly negligent” and “FBI general counsel James Baker believed-almost until the last minute before Comey’s announcement-that Clinton should, in fact, face criminal prosecution, be he was talked out of it.”

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The anti-Trump mentality inside the bureau affected all decision making and instead prompted the individuals to “focus more urgently on the now disproven Trump-Russia collusion allegations rather than to finish work on the former secretary of State’s email problems.”

In summary, letters of Clinton’s espionage were blatantly ignored. Demands to look into highly classified evidence was ignored. The “FBI’s chief lawyer originally thought Clinton should be indicted, and the bureau wrote a draft supporting the felony standard, but then walked back its decision.” FBI agents willfully chose to turn a blind eye to Clinton and focus on “unsubstantiated Trump collusion than Clinton emails in what the IG feared might be a sign of bias.”

Hill author John Solomon sums it up spectacularly: “It’s exactly that sort of behavior that leaves many Americans wondering whether there are two systems of justice inside the FBI – one for the Clintons, and one for the rest of the country.”