Congresswoman Ilhan Omar–known for her anti-Semitic rhetoric–has introduced a resolution to support the right to boycott Israel.

Fox News reports:

Omar’s resolution seeks to push back against U.S. laws banning the boycott of Israel and affirms the right of Americans to organize boycotts of foreign countries if they so wish.

While the resolution doesn’t explicitly name Israel or the pro-Palestinian Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, she told media outlets that the resolution concerns the Jewish state.

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Omar told Al-Monitor, “We are introducing a resolution … to really speak about the American values that support and believe in our ability to exercise our First Amendment rights in regard to boycotting. And it is an opportunity for us to explain why it is we support a nonviolent movement, which is the BDS movement.”

The resolution, introduced Tuesday, compares the right to boycott to the United States’ boycott of Nazi Germany:

“Americans of conscience have a proud history of participating in boycotts to advocate for human rights abroad including … boycotting Nazi Germany from March 1933 to October 1941 in response to the dehumanization of the Jewish people in the lead-up to the Holocaust.”

The measure will be co-sponsored by the first Palestinian Congresswoman, Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA).

Omar has come under fire recently for her anti-Semitic rhetoric, and yesterday she said she did not regret her February claims that lawmakers who support Israel are financially motivated to do so.

Speaking with CBS’ Gayle King, Omar said, “Oftentimes there are things that you might say that might not hold weight for you but for someone else. The way that we hear and consume information is very different than how the next person might.”

“So you don’t regret your words either?” asked King.

“I do not but I…am grateful for the opportunity to really learn how my words made people feel and have taken every single opportunity I’ve gotten to make sure people understood that I apologize for it…”

“Would you like to make it clear that you are not anti-Semitic?”

“Oh certainly not, yes.”

“Would you like to make that clear?”

“Yes and nothing I said, at least to me, was meant for that purpose.”