Virginia has been dominating the headlines for the unprecedented gun control legislation their newly Democrat controlled General Assembly is proposing and passing.

After already passing three gun control bills earlier in the month, Virginia passed a red flag law the day after 22,000 showed up to peacefully protest in Richmond, and also rejected a proposed pro-gun bill. While the most radical bill (SB 16) that would’ve effectively banned most firearms in Virginia by re-defining them as “assault weapons” was shot down, a nearly identical version of it still exists and Democrats aren’t giving up on it.

And that’s not the half of it. While we’ve all been focused on the absurd gun laws coming out of Virginia, that’s hardly all their newly Democrat dominated government has been busy with. Here are just five other pieces of legislation that Virginia Democrats would like to pass:

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No Photo ID to Vote – SB 65: Removes the requirement that voters show a form of identification containing a photograph in order to be allowed to vote.

Making Electoral College Votes Go to the Popular Vote Winner – SB 399: Enters Virginia into an interstate compact known as the Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote. Article II of the Constitution of the United States gives the states exclusive and plenary authority to decide the manner of awarding their electoral votes. Under the compact, Virginia agrees to award its electoral votes to the presidential ticket that receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The compact goes into effect when states cumulatively possessing a majority of the electoral votes have joined the compact.

Makes Governor Elected by Congressional Districts, Not a Statewide Majority – SJ 29: Changes the method of election for the Governor, and by reference, the Lieutenant Governor and Attorney General. The candidate receiving the highest number of votes in a majority of each of the congressional districts shall be declared elected.

Voting Rights for Felons – SJ 14: Authorizes the General Assembly to provide by general law for the restoration of civil rights for persons convicted of a felony.

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Doubling the Governor’s Term Limit – SJ 6: Permits a Governor elected in 2025 and thereafter to succeed himself in office. The amendment allows two four-year terms (either in succession or not in succession) but prohibits election to a third term. Service for more than two years of a partial term counts as service for one term.

And that’s just to name a few.